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When You're Hot You're Hot--and When You're Not You're Not!


Grizabella
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For those of you who are newer to the cards, did you start out gangbusters and now you feel like you're lukewarm or that you've lost all the ground you've gained? Let's talk about it together here.  I've experienced several of those down-swings over the years and I've learned that they're actually like the dormancy of a perennial seedling---a time when it's getting more solidly established where it's planted.  It's a normal resting period that gives our intuition a time to grow and absorb what we've learned but aren't yet able to access readily.  In my own reading history, these times have proven to be blessings in disguise.  When I resume practice each time, it's as though I've suddenly leapt ahead by a mile without consciously realizing it. 

 

I think anyone can post in this thread, not just club members and if so, those who aren't members are quite welcome to join into the discussion.  I hope this will turn out to be an encouragement for our new readers, or for those not so new who may just now have experienced this phenomenon.  If any of you experienced this and found a way to come out of it by necessity instead of waiting for it to return on its own, that would be a positive for the discussion, too.

 

I'm still learning how to run this club and I have what I call "dumb spots" so your patience is highly appreciated.  I hope to get the hang of it soon but sometimes it takes me awhile to catch onto certain things. 

 

The lady who was like extended family and was helping raise my oldest great-grandson and was starting to homeschool him and my great-granddaughter suddenly passed away after Christmas and several weeks later so did my sister, and then I got covid so I've really been out of my "groove" for a few months and haven't used my cards very much.  It seems like a good time to start this discussion.

 

 

 

 

 

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euripides

Dear Griz, it sounds like you've been having a tough time of it. I'm so sorry for your sad losses. And ill health on top of it all. I've been reading a bit of Lama Surya Das lately, 'Letting Go of the Person You Used to Be' and it was the perfect thing as I'd been struggling a bit. His gentle, loving reminder that life is suffering and loss is oddly reassuring. He asks us to think about the things we've lost and whether we've come to terms with those losses, or not, and some we might never come to terms with. I don't know if his writing and Buddhist philosophy would appeal to you or not, but anyway, I hope the universe is bringing you the people and wisdom and loving-kindness you need at this time. 

 

I've just come back to Tarot after a long time away again. I've had many such times and it's a bit of a peripheral part of my life which can make it hard to maintain contact with the community. I'm glad you all have mostly kept your old names. I should have perhaps kept Euripides but it didn't seem to fit anymore. Archimedes isn't working for me either. Hmm.

 

Anyway... yes... regarding domancy; I think it's fine, as you say, perhaps its needed. Even for a more mature plant, as a tree in winter time when it drops its leaves and withdraws into itself and lets the storm pass by. I think it can be a problem though for those of us who are easily distracted, and also if you have a lot going on, as that hard-earned knowledge can be dislodged by new information, or just fade through disuse. All new things are shiny and exciting and maybe once that novely wears off a little we lose interest.

 I think I'd encourage newer readers to consider ways to maintain a steady practice, even if just reviewing one card each day, reflecting a moment on its meaning, or spending a little time once a week, just to keep the cards in memory. Perhaps using an app, if you don't feel like getting the cards out. But if you need to just step away, that's fine, too.

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Letting Go of the Person You Used to Be!  How apt to describe this time in my life.  I'm 75 years old and in these "twilight years", as they're sometimes so pessimistically referred to, I've certainly given lots and lots of thought to "the person I used to be".  It's a hard transition to make and I've struggled with it for quite a few years now.  In my head I'm young, strong, healthy, slim and attractive, can still dance (I LOVE to dance and now can't walk unassisted) can still spark devotion and lust in a man's eyes, can still drive like Mario Andretti but now can't---and on and on---and even maybe once a year or so a sleeping hormone will kick in and my libido gets mistakenly optimistic that I should reconsider celibacy but then before I can act on it, the libido snores again peacefully.  (Thank heavens! That could be a very embarrassing and humiliating scenario. LOL )

 

But anyway, as a matter of fact, I do follow much Buddhist philosophy and so do my daughters.  I'm very anti-organized religion and Buddhism falls into that category for me so I'm not Buddhist but I do admire a lot of the Buddhist philosophy and teachings. Is that a book or an article I can find somewhere?

 

 

 

 

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euripides

Ageing, as the saying goes, not for the faint-hearted. I'm well past middle-aged now and health has meant I've had to let a few things go, some of which have been very tough to deal with. Our youth-obsessed culture doesn't help, but while I'm not a pagan proper, pagan wisdom has helped. Something has happened in our society that means we've lost connection with our elders, and while this is often framed as elder neglect and old people can become very lonely, I think it's also a great loss for younger people too - we've lost that wisdom and guidance. And sadly the media love to drive a wedge in there, too. I'm grateful for places like this where we can connect.

 

The Surya Das is a book:  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/285059.Letting_Go_of_the_Person_You_Used_to_Be

 

There's quite a bit of personal anecdote in there but I think the wisdom makes it worthwhile. I'm trying to figure out how I feel about this idea of detachment, as I feel the flipside can be a sense that things aren't worthwhile. I was very interested in Buddhism for a while though like you, I don't do organized religion. I often wish I do - I sometimes envy that structure and security that it appears to bring. I've tried several religions but it always feels a bit like I'm putting on a costume; I can't quite internalize it.

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You have had a rough year, Grizabella.

 

Mine has not been so great either --in the last nine months or so I was hit by a rowdy driver and lost my car, got COVID, lost a couple of dear friends to COVID, an uncle (well, he was well over 101 years of age, so it kinda doesn't count), just had my third eye surgery of the year (hopefully my last), and will probably need a nerve blocked in my spine before 2021 is over. And one of my oldest and dearest friends just got diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver.

 

But pain is not a competition. Those are the things that happened (are happening) to me, and the things you speak about are the ones that happened (are happening) to you.

 

I started reading Buddhism when I was very young, and I spent 20 years practicing Nichiren Buddhism in the Soka Gakkai. I don't practice anymore (organized religion and organizations are not for me, and I'm back to my essentially agnostic ways) but Buddhism and its values was and is a pillar of strength in my life. A word to the wise: there are a gazillion schools of Buddhism, and while the basic tenets are more of less the same for everyone the teachings can vary wildly.

 

Here is a page of wisdom from Nichiren, a Japanese monk who followed the Lotus Sutra and whose disciples in turn sparked several "sub-schools": https://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/wnd-1/Content/1. He also said in another letter "Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life..."

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On 7/4/2021 at 7:19 PM, euripides said:

I'm trying to figure out how I feel about this idea of detachment, as I feel the flipside can be a sense that things aren't worthwhile. I was very interested in Buddhism for a while though like you, I don't do organized religion. I often wish I do - I sometimes envy that structure and security that it appears to bring. I've tried several religions but it always feels a bit like I'm putting on a costume; I can't quite internalize it.

 

Euripides, I think that you, like me, are probably a born agnostic. I have finally embraced it. I grew up Catholic, tried several religions on for size, settled on Buddhism for a long time and practiced the teachings of a particular school for 20 years, and all of those things are a part of me and have made me who I am, but in the end I cannot tie myself up to any of them.

Edited by FLizarraga
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euripides
10 hours ago, FLizarraga said:

 

Euripides, I think that you, like me, are probably a born agnostic.

 

Perhaps so. Your path sounds very similar to mine.

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On 7/3/2021 at 3:07 AM, Grizabella said:

Letting Go of the Person You Used to Be!  How apt to describe this time in my life.  I'm 75 years old and in these "twilight years", as they're sometimes so pessimistically referred to, I've certainly given lots and lots of thought to "the person I used to be".  It's a hard transition to make and I've struggled with it for quite a few years now.  In my head I'm young, strong, healthy, slim and attractive, can still dance (I LOVE to dance and now can't walk unassisted) can still spark devotion and lust in a man's eyes, can still drive like Mario Andretti but now can't---and on and on---

I am there with you sister!  I'm going to be 67 in Feb and yet sure as hell don't feel it in my mind!  I want to dance again too but I can't.  I have limited  mobility also but I sure can spin around in my office chair though! :bubble_blol:  Hang in there, Griz, you have truly gone through so much.  I was bed ridden for almost a year and never looked at my cards but when I was healed, I was able to get up, pack away over half of my cards and start all over again but this time with an even more understanding of the cards and their purpose.  You're doing great, Griz! :bubble_blovekiss:

Edited by Saturn Celeste
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