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AJ-ish/Sharyn

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Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose.   Not sure what I'm thinking about it at the moment;  I can't stop turning the pages (although the constant use of untranslated languages (mostly latin - which my school did not offer!) is making me think -  am I supposed to be able to read it?  am I supposed to stop to look it up?  or am I supposed to feel like I just don't understand everything that's going on?).    I don't understand what's going on, that's true.    I feel a bit irritated - from a 21st century perspective, it seems so obvious which characters are the voice of reason and which are - stereotypes? of a medieval belief system.   But I keep reading.  🙂 

 

And for light relief - the mention of Amelia Peabody a while back inspired me to re-read - and so I've just started The Mummy Case.   (I so want to go to Egypt!   A cruise down the Nile is so on my bucket list.)

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can you imagine taking those kinds of trips in the 1800's?  Of course there were no luggage weight restrictions then 😉

 

I just finished Wilderness Essays by John Muir. It got pretty flowery. But it was a hell of a trip. 

Currently an oldie but goodie by Rex Stout, Some Buried Caesar

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On 1/4/2020 at 3:54 PM, Cobweb said:

Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose.   Not sure what I'm thinking about it at the moment;  I can't stop turning the pages (although the constant use of untranslated languages (mostly latin - which my school did not offer!) is making me think -  am I supposed to be able to read it?  am I supposed to stop to look it up?  or am I supposed to feel like I just don't understand everything that's going on?).    I don't understand what's going on, that's true.    I feel a bit irritated - from a 21st century perspective, it seems so obvious which characters are the voice of reason and which are - stereotypes? of a medieval belief system.   But I keep reading.  🙂 

 

And for light relief - the mention of Amelia Peabody a while back inspired me to re-read - and so I've just started The Mummy Case.   (I so want to go to Egypt!   A cruise down the Nile is so on my bucket list.)

The name of the Rose is one of my favorite movies 

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18 minutes ago, Bodhiseed said:

Finished both the YA Nevermoor books, and thoroughly enjoyed them. Read the The Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo - at my daughter's request; it's a dark, urban fantasy that ended up being quite a page turner.

I discovered Leigh Bardugo a few weeks ago. I read Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom.  Crooked Kingdom had me in tears. I also read her Wonder Woman. She's a really good YA author!

 

I must look out for Nevermoor.

 

If eerie, creepy, look-over-your-shoulder-if-you-read-at-night books are your thing, I'm reading a new (to me) author, Madeleine Roux, another YA author. It's the Asylum trilogy. Reading during the day, you think, "Ah yeah, this is ok." Read it at night, it's a completely different story....

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The Rain Wilds Chronicles: Dragon Keeper, Dragon Haven, City of Dragons, and Blood of Dragons by Robin Hobb. 

This was a multibook offer on BookBub I almost didn't get. 

The author lives near me, so I get the setting of her Dragon Keeper world building 🙂 

and I could do without the humans...I just want to be with the dragons! What a ride...old and tired and starved when cocooned, mutant and stupid when hatched, scorned and banished...I can say no more without spoilers! Am mid-way through the 4th book. 

 

In between I started and ditched Deadly Dram: A Whisky Business Mystery by Melinda Mullet. I read the 1st one last year and enjoyed learning a lot about making whisky, and interesting characters, ok mystery. the 2nd...zzzzzzzzzzzzz 

 

And have read several Cadfael mysteries, set in 1000 Britain. The DVD series with Derek Jacobi is excellent also! 

Edited by AJ-ish/Sharyn
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Can These Bones Live, Edward Dahlbberg.

Essays on Moby Dick, Walden Woods and Edgar Allan Poe. Comparissons of these writings and how they metaphorically represent America during their writings. Very interesting point of view. Found it in a used book store and had no idea this is actually a bit rare (1st edition) and well respected for its straight forward candor. 

A lot of comparisons with and to Shakespeare as well. He even touches on Shakespeare using the Fool and Faith. Coincidence? 

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added about Shakespeare
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Into Amelia Peabody, courtesy of Lillie. I'm still on the first book, as - while it's an easy read, the writing is such fun, you find you want to go slowly. But I ordered the next 6 cheap on line.

 

I hate first editions. We have several - including a couple of the Narnia books - but it makes you feel you have to be CAREFUL. I like to READ, no venerate ! Mind you - I DID have all the Narnia ones and gave them to a friend (she bought me new ones i exchange) as she was into first editions and I am, not. But my partner was so horrified - not for MONEY, but because they had been gifts from my godmother - that when she was clearing out stuff, we asked for them back  - she'd given some to a children's reading project, but we have some again...

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8 minutes ago, gregory said:

Into Amelia Peabody, courtesy of Lillie. I'm still on the first book, as - while it's an easy read, the writing is such fun, you find you want to go slowly. But I ordered the next 6 cheap on line.

 

I hate first editions. We have several - including a couple of the Narnia books - but it makes you feel you have to be CAREFUL. I like to READ, no venerate ! Mind you - I DID have all the Narnia ones and gave them to a friend (she bought me new ones i exchange) as she was into first editions and I am, not. But my partner was so horrified - not for MONEY, but because they had been gifts from my godmother - that when she was clearing out stuff, we asked for them back  - she'd given some to a children's reading project, but we have some again...

I have several first editions but I treat them much as I do everything in my life - I enjoy them respectfully. But I don’t have any ridiculously expensive or rare books though. 

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Face It, the Debbie Harry autobiography. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/28/style/debbie-harry-memoir.html

I normally steer away from celeb memoirs. There are exceptions (David Stenn's wonderful books on Jean Harlow and Clara Bow come to mind), but for the most part, they really aren't worth reading. Debbie is a smart cookie, though. I'm loving her insights and her slant on things! 

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Death in Londinium 
by John Drake

don't know what that is so BIG 😉 but it's a big book, mystery at its roots, but set in Roman Britain/Britannia about 60 years after Boudica's revolt. If the Greek slave Ikaros of Apollonius can't figure out who killed his owner all 400 slaves in the household will be killed. Talk about pressure. 

In synchronicity, today one of my favorite bloggers showed a Roman military dagger from the time, 

http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/57908

click on the bottom image, feast your eyes. And we think We are modern and skilled. 

 

I'm also working my way through the annotated Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

 

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Now on Doing Time by Jodi Taylor - a spinoff from the  Chronicles of St Mary's series.

Three misfits recruited by the Time Police, to stop time travelers from messing with the world's natural timeline. I'm leery when a book is advertised as funny, it is hard to write 'funny'. But I did get one belly laugh so far so all is good. 

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The Last Girl (The Dominion Trilogy Book 1) by Joe Hart, an 'end of the world as we know it' story.

Girl births just stop, and the results there in. I can't tell how far ahead in time it is set, but cities have had time to collapse. 

And of course women and girls of childbearing age are imprisoned. Any women are trapped and sold for whatever. 

 

I'm about 1/2 way thru the first book and am losing momentum, hard to care about any of the people involved. I'll probably start speed reading at this point 🙂 

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Thanks again @AJ-ish/Sharyn for helping me find my way here. 

 

So yes, I've been reading "The Power if Myths" by Joseph Campbell - and very much enjoying it so far! I've read a few conversation/transcript type books - and always wonder why there isn't more of them around. lol. I enjoy the flow...

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I have a boring hand project I'm working on, so am listening to Dispatches by Michael Herr based on his experiences and observations as a journalist from time in Vietnam during the late 60's. It is very good, and the reader must be from New England, he often sounds like Stephen King who was the reader for many of his early audio books. Sounds like an old friend, I've listened to many hours of that voice, sia King. 

 

that was was was 20 years long and cost 57000 (admitted) US lives. In less than 6 months we are up to 100,000+ from bungled leadership. Nothing ever changes, sad to say. But I do recommend the book

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I pinned this thread so that it will be easier to find! 

 

I recently finished Wine of Angels (great book) and I am currently reading a Swedish book about the historical role of women in Scandinavia. So lots of archaeological information and descriptions of what we know about Norse women through the earliest history and up until the Viking days. 

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NorseHippie

Ooo books!

Right now, I’ve got three books going...all three serious, 2 informational and 1 seriously awesome fiction trilogy

- Morrigan Celtic Goddess of Magick and Might by Courtney Weber

- Anam Cara by John O’Donohue

- His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman (I’m on book 3, The Amber Spyglass)

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Fighters of Fear: Occult Detective Stories compiled by Mike Ashley. In recent years, probably because I seem to have the attention span of a gnat,
I've come to love anthologies. Mike has done some great ones, my favorites are based on a particular time, mystery short stories based in Jacobean times, Roman times, ancient Egyptian times. Total fun. Most were titled Mammoth book of ... whatever. They are a great way to pick up new authors too. 
I've only just started this one, no + or - for it yet 🙂 
Edited by AJ-ish/Sharyn
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