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AJ-ish/Sharyn

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On 12/2/2019 at 2:38 PM, Raggydoll said:

I’m reading Patanjali’s Yoga-Sutra. I’ve been looking at different translations/commentaries to get an idea of the various takes on it and it’s very interesting. I will probably read some Mahayana Sutras next. 

I do this with the Bhagavad Gita! I think it's a great way to get the most out of a text that is not from your native tongue/culture.

 

@Cobweb, Umberto Eco is a tricky author. And I mean that because his loyalties are really divided between wanting to tell a story and his love for historical accuracy. If you finish 'The Name of the Rose' and you want more of his stuff, I recommend 'The Prague Cemetery' - very eerie, and oddly timely in how it deals with conspiracy theory as a mask for racism and hate.

 

As for me I'm currently splitting time between 'The Tree of Life' by Israel Redgardie and a compiled translation of The Nag-Hammadi Scriptures. Both are great - but I may need a fiction break pretty soon!

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On 12/30/2019 at 1:52 PM, Bodhiseed said:

Me Before You by JoJo Moyes - bittersweet but good. 

 

Oh, I saw the movie and didn't realize it was an adaptation of a novel.  I borrowed the DVD from the library because Brendan Coyle is in it (at the time I was randomly picking actors and borrowing whatever they were in just to expand my film viewing/knowledge. Can't wait for libraries to open again!).  It was good and sad and bittersweet, and I'd wondered how/why they came up with the story.  Of course it was an adaptation, almost every film is, but I seem to forget that.  It certainly addresses a thought-provoking subject.

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17 hours ago, gregory said:

I finished a book and cannot decide what to read next. I want something NEW, and the libraries are not open (I don't do kindle....) I am ANNOYED !

Our library is doing curbside service (and since my daughter works there, I hope they continue this way for a little longer!).

I like series-type novels, so she brought home one by C.J. Boxx (Joe Picket series - "Long Range") and one by Jonathan Kellerman - "The Museum of Desire" (though I do prefer his wife's books).

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17 hours ago, gregory said:

I finished a book and cannot decide what to read next. I want something NEW, and the libraries are not open (I don't do kindle....) I am ANNOYED !

You could try AbeBooks - they often have second hand books at charity shop prices and often with free postage - they have a special search for that.  You might be able to find something you want to try there.

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The book I'm reading at the moment is The Oxford Anthology of English Poetry.  It is exactly the type of relaxing reading my brain wants right now.  I've got the second volume.  The two volumes are organised by poet's date of birth, and the book I'm reading goes from 1757 to "present day".  Where present day is actually 1986 and actually the last poet was born in  1939, but lets not nit-pick too much here!  I've discovered some new to me poets - I've been enjoying Samuel Rogers and Sir Walter Scott in particular so far.

 

I'm also listening to "Gingerbread" by Helen Oyeyemi as an audiobook while I craft.  It is really intriguing.  I can't wait to see where the story goes!  My library has offered digital audiobooks during the lockdown, I really hope it continues afterwards!

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18 hours ago, gregory said:

I finished a book and cannot decide what to read next. I want something NEW, and the libraries are not open (I don't do kindle....) I am ANNOYED !

I don't have a kindle either, never have, I downloaded the free app to my ipad, but it can be done on a laptop also.  And there are literally millions of free books that can be read on it! It is very expensive to belong to a library here, and to top that off, out library has been flooded twice. This last time it reopened after 2 years it is sadly short of books and heavy on dvds... I absolutely Love a physical book. The smell, the feel, the sound of the pages turning. But as my vision continues to fail, an e-reader is my only option.  Don't knock it till you try it my friend but continue to treasure those physical books!  🙂 

With the kindle app I can continue to upscale the font size to the point of have ten words on a page I expect, and I can change the font type and background to suit my changing vision. 

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legendaryelement

I have been on a Major Spree (what with my birthday coming soon & not being able to go/do anything) ~ The ones that are really "floating my boat" at the moment are:

 

Initiation Into Numerology by Johann Heyss

Behind Numerology by Shirley Blackwell Larwence

 

A few that need more time to go over:

 

Stephen Arroyo's Chart Interpretation Handbook

Complete Horoscope Interpretation by Maritha Pottenger

The Numbers In Our Lives: A Course in ACP Numerology by Amie Angeli

 

And technically, this is a website, but I am having fun with it (great pdf resources)

https://divinationlessons.wordpress.com/

 

 

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So I came across this on one of my favorite publishers Instagram posts. Taschen's specialty is art and design books of which I own a few. 

 

This book is the first in their Library of Esoterica series. 

 

While I'm tapped out on the tarot budget for a couple months, I thought someone might be interested in this! 

 

https://www.taschen.com/pages/en/catalogue/art/all/08003/facts.tarot.htm

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I usually have a few books on the go, at the moment, apart from Benebell Wen's Holistic Tarot which arrived today (only read a few pages so far) i have a couple on the go on my Kindle app - just about to finish book 15 in a series by Frank Tayell - I think i'll be done with the zombie apocalypse for a while after this... I'm also part way through High and Low by Keith Foskett who writes books about long distance hiking (i've read all his other books)

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On 5/29/2020 at 4:35 AM, and_it_spoke said:

As for me I'm currently splitting time between 'The Tree of Life' by Israel Redgardie and a compiled translation of The Nag-Hammadi Scriptures. Both are great - but I may need a fiction break pretty soon!

How is "The tree of life" going? Thoughts?

 

I'm slowly going through The Qabalistic Tarot by Robert Wang, but I was tossing up between that and one of Israel Regardie's books before I bought it. 

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On 5/29/2020 at 1:29 PM, stephanelli said:

You could try AbeBooks - they often have second hand books at charity shop prices and often with free postage - they have a special search for that.  You might be able to find something you want to try there.

Oh I buy from there all the time. But we have maybe 20k books. Maybe more. I don't want to add any, really.

 

There MUST be something we own that I'd like if I opened it !

 

But I remembered one I was saving for later now; another Elizabeth Peters' Amelia Peabody one - The Last Camel Died at Noon.

 

And I just finished a delightful one we do own - The Return of the Black Death. I DID enjoy that. Non-fiction and seriously interesting.

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40 minutes ago, gregory said:

And I just finished a delightful one we do own - The Return of the Black Death.

Sounds like watching Air Crash Investigations before a long haul flight.... 🤣

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I'm accidently reading three books (this often happens), The Chymical Wedding by Lindsay Clarke, Amora: Stories by Natalia Borges Polesso and the one that's leading to splutters of outrage and discussions with my husband, Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez - a lot of it is stuff I know, but put it all together in one place and... 

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Just finished The Dreaming Jewels, by Theodore Sturgeon; rather old fashioned sf (written in the1950s) but a very brisk, short, satisfying read - it's only 120 pages or so, I finished it literally in one sitting.

 

As with a lot of pre-90s sf, I suspect I've read it as a child, in Dutch; my father had a huge collection of translated sf (there was a Dutch publishing house that did a lot of those in the 70s and 80s) and when I ran out of library books to read, he introduced me to Jack Vance, Ursula LeGuin, Philip K Dick, the Dune books, even some Rachel Pollack!

Some of them I would read over and over again through the years, until they literally fell apart.

I sometimes re-read them now in English and it's weird to have whole sentences and paragraphs echo in a different language.

 

I've also just finished the first Mrs Pollifax book; not sure if I've read any of those before, it was much more grim and violent than I imagined, not really a 'cosy' at all!

 

I'm reading bits of the first James Herriott book in between, a story or two of the big Ray Bradbury collection in bed (I own pretty much all of those stories in 15 or so separate collections; some of those are in Dutch though, and pretty much all of them are disintegrating, they're ancient paperbacks) and I've just started The Long Earth, by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter.

 

 

I usually have several books on the go at the same time, both paper books and stuff on my e-reader (and independent one, *not* a Kindle).

Depending on mood, time, location, lighting, concentration level etc I switch from one to the other; I can use my e-reader while knitting which is great, but in bed I prefer a paper book - no screens in the bedroom, not even the unlit e-reader one.

 

Some books I read in one big gulp, other are spread out over days, weeks or even years....

Edited by Hedera
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I just finished the audio of A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute. Setting aside the 1950's view of Australian Aboriginals it is a wonderful story, and I thought about starting it again. The movie with  Helen Morse and Bryan Brown did a very good job with the book, I think it must have been a mini-series because it didn't leave much out. 

 

Right now I'm reading a Horror Anthology. It is running about 50 good 50 what the heck was that all about. 

On the side I'm rereading the Hobbit. So Good. 

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6 hours ago, Grace said:

How is "The tree of life" going? Thoughts?

 

I'm slowly going through The Qabalistic Tarot by Robert Wang, but I was tossing up between that and one of Israel Regardie's books before I bought it. 

 

It is absolutely a fascinating read, though it seems to vacillate between just how seriously it takes itself and the traditional (up until it's time) approach to magick. 

 

On one hand, he's very passionate and persuasive about the power of imagination as a tool for a magician and that it overrides the trappings of magick which should be used to enhance and focus the imagination. You can see the seeds of 1990's 'chaos magic' theory here.

 

Then on the other hand, he stands up for precise study and application of certain traditional aspects of magick that it seems contradictory. And his insistence that his approach to magick is 'scientific' and factual kind of takes ones head out of the game.

 

But overall, worthwhile and full of ideas and concept to mentally chew on.

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9 hours ago, and_it_spoke said:

 

It is absolutely a fascinating read, though it seems to vacillate between just how seriously it takes itself and the traditional (up until it's time) approach to magick. 

 

On one hand, he's very passionate and persuasive about the power of imagination as a tool for a magician and that it overrides the trappings of magick which should be used to enhance and focus the imagination. You can see the seeds of 1990's 'chaos magic' theory here.

 

Then on the other hand, he stands up for precise study and application of certain traditional aspects of magick that it seems contradictory. And his insistence that his approach to magick is 'scientific' and factual kind of takes ones head out of the game.

 

But overall, worthwhile and full of ideas and concept to mentally chew on.

That does sound interesting. I think it might be next book on the list, that or the Pomegranate one.... decisions decisions.... 

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14 hours ago, Grace said:

That does sound interesting. I think it might be next book on the list, that or the Pomegranate one.... decisions decisions.... 

 

Personally, I'd go for 'Garden of Pomegranates' first. It's shorter, and gives information on Qabalah that he uses in Tree of Life. Plus, you can decide if you can get on board with his writing style or not.

 

But whichever path is yours, I hope it's a good one. 🙂

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The Dresden Files... I've been enjoying some of them too Bodhiseed.

 

In the news today, https://www.baileys.com/en-gb/reclaim-her-name/

These 25 books are free to download from Baileys publishing, books first published under pen names because it was thought (and still is) than a mans name or gender neutral name would sell better. 

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So many books, so little time--mostly just light reading for me anymore. Recently, I was rearranging book cases and set aside The Sisters of Sorcery (1976). I sort of collect 60's and 70's occult fiction/non-fiction (amusing, interesting, sometimes preposterous) when I'm out at yard sales, meandering through resale shops or digging around in someone's dusty garage. I picked this up somewhere and tucked it into a bookshelf with intentions to read it some time. Now is the time. 😄

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I've already read The Silver Bullet in a book by the same name (also on my bookshelf). I used to have a few copies of The Silver Bullet and I ended up giving them away to friends and kept the one for my own collection.

 

 

 

 

 

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oh that looks like a fun one 53rd!

I finished the horror anthology, I'd give it 2 stars, so many, trying too hard. 

 

As a relief I'm rereading Dorthy Sayers Gaudy Night published 1935. I probably like the movie better. with  Harriet Walter and Edward Petherbridge as Harriet Vane and Lord Wimsey, but I need a break from heavy stuff and it is a good story, well written characters. 

Edited by AJ-ish/Sharyn
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