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In Your Book Bag, On Your Kindle?


AJ-ish/Sharyn

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Thankfully I've finished Men Who Hate Women by Laura Bates. That was a depressing read, and makes me wonder how I can keep my little boy away from online misogyny when he's older and I can't control what he accesses online anymore. I have started talking to him about it, at a gentle, generic level of people lying online. I get nostalgic for my childhood sometimes...

 

Anyway, now I'm reading Red Moon by Miranda Gray, who I mainly know of as illustrator of a couple of tarot decks, bit these days seems to mainly write about the menstrual cycle. This might be something I needed to read 30 years ago really, but I'll take what lessons I can from it now.

 

I'm also reading Walking the Tree by Kaaron Warren, not got very far with it yet, just figuring out the social set up, where the men appear to stay in the settlement they were born in, and a lot of the young women travel around the Tree (they live in/on or around a huge tree on an island in an ocean, with no other land that anyone knows of) to pick a mate essentially. I'll see how it goes.

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I'm reading Princess Bride. I'm glad I saw the movie first, otherwise it would be a bit of a muddle. 

Our hero just went in the Machine. Yikes. 

 

I just got a notice from Amazon 'Your selected charity received a $986,782.39 donation from AmazonSmile"  I don't know if these come once a year, probably, but hooray! 

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Page of Ghosts

I'm working my way through the Hobbit again, this time my small, cute hardcover copy of it in English with Tolkiens artwork on the dust jacket. I also have it on Kindle in English, plus a Norwegian pocket edition I was gifted when I was 12 or so, so I think it's safe to say I enjoy the book 😁

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2 hours ago, Page of Ghosts said:

I'm working my way through the Hobbit again, this time my small, cute hardcover copy of it in English with Tolkiens artwork on the dust jacket. I also have it on Kindle in English, plus a Norwegian pocket edition I was gifted when I was 12 or so, so I think it's safe to say I enjoy the book 😁

Lovely! My little boy went through a period of loving it and I had to read it repeatedly to him (and remember to edit it anything about the giant spiders being killed as he really liked spiders!), as soon as it was finished he'd want to start again. I was grateful for the Kindle version as it meant I could read it with the lights off in the hope he would fall asleep!

 

I'm up for reading him The Lord of the Rings soon if he wants, I'd read it myself by his age, but he's quite sensitive to anything upsetting. I read him the Phantom Tollbooth and he was in tears at the end because he thought the boy in it would never see his friends again.

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I just finished Five Red Herrings by Dorothy Sayers, far prefered the movie version with Ian Carmichael, the figuring out the trains goes on and on and on in the book. 

And am reading recipes for my new insta-pot. I got it to make yogurt (delicious and easy) but would like to make more use that than of my investment. Sometimes it was easier to buy books when reviews weren't available.

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I'm currently reading Call Down the Hawk by Maggie Stiefvater. I'm struggling to really get into it because it's hard to care about the new characters after the original friend group in the Raven Cycle. I do also have the audiobook, so I might just listen to it instead. 

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I read Stephen King's Carrie in one sitting yesterday. I read it when it first came out in the 70's. I don't think it made me so sad back then, probably because I was still close enough to high school crapola to know while there is nothing meaner than kids, but mostly they are a mixed bag rather than junkyard dogs. 

I did spend a few years recently where I would have happily rained down destruction on some people, so I had a better feel for Carrie and the utter despair she must have felt at the end. 

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I started reading Damien Echols' High Magick. I've been watching his YouTube channel for a while, and he has such an incredible story. He was sentenced to death row for a crime he didn't comit and spent 20 years in jail before finally additional evidence came into the light. He was studying magick during his imprisonment and found a lot of comfort in it. I'm finding a lot of comfort looking at his YT content and reading his book. 🙂

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Finished Walking the Tree by Kaaron Warren. It was, interesting? I don't know, I mostly enjoyed it I think it just seemed to lack something. 

 

Anyway, reading The Cuckoo's Calling by J K Rowling, partly out of curiosity and partly because I thought it would be an easy read. It was also Kindle Daily Deal for 99p. It is indeed an easy read, and while I usually would go for Nordic Noir on the fairly rare occasions I fancy some crime fiction, I'm getting more into it than I expected, if only because there's a couple characters I detest and I'm really hoping they get their comeuppance...

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Ahh well. Finished that. Not much to say really, it was an easy, quick read. Which is what I wanted.

 

So next up from my virtual stack of unread books is Ashes to Dust by Yrsa Sigurðardóttir, book 3 of the Thóra Gudmundsdóttir books. Enjoyed the first one, the second one was upsetting, so I've had quite a long break but I'm in the mood for some crime fiction.

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smittenkitten

I'm heavily into the psychology/trauma books at the moment. I'm reading Rick Morton's "My Year of Living Vulnerably", "The Body Keeps the Score" (Bessel Van Der Kolk), and Rising Strong (Brene Brown).

For something a bit lighter I've got a biography of Princess Margaret on my kindle. 

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13 hours ago, smittenkitten said:

"The Body Keeps the Score" (Bessel Van Der Kolk)

I started that a long time ago, really should go back to it.

 

I finished Ashes to Dust, moved on to and finished Whiteout by Ragnar Jónasson and I'm now going to read A Shadow on the Lens by Sam Hurcom becaiuse it's set not a million miles from where I live and I spent a lot of time there as a child.

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