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EvelynnMorragan

Best Tarot Books List

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EvelynnMorragan

So here is a list of the most frequently recommended tarot books I compiled after searching through about 10 pages of a Google search:

 

Number indicates how many times it was recommended.

 

11. Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom by R. Pollack

 

10. Holistic Tarot by B. Wen

 

8. 21 Ways to Read a Tarot Card by M.K. Greer

 

7. Tarot for Yourself by M.K. Greer

    Learning the Tarot by J. Bunning

 

6. Tarot 101 by K. Huggens

 

5. Kitchen Table Tarot by M. Cynova

    The Easiest Way to Learn the Tarot Ever! by D. White

    The Pictorial Key to the Tarot by A.E. Waite

    The Complete Book of Tarot Reversals by M.K. Greer

    Understanding the Tarot Court by M.K. Greer

 

4. The Tarot: History, Symbolism & Divination by R. Place

    Tarot for Beginners by B. Moore

    Tarot Spreads: Layouts & Techniques by B. Moore

    The New Tarot Handbook by R. Pollack

    Tarot Plain & Simple by A. Louis

 

3. Tarot for Life by P. Quinn

    Tarot Wisdom by R. Pollack

    Tarot of the Bohemians by Papus

    The Complete Guide to the Tarot by E. Gray

    The Ultimate Guide to the Rider-Waite Tarot by J. & E. Burger

    Who Are You in the Tarot? by M.K. Greer

    Tarosophy by M. Katz

    A History of the Occult Tarot by M. Dummett & R. Decker

    A Wicked Pack of Cards by M. Dummett & R. Decker

    Modern Tarot by M. Tea

    WTF is Tarot & How Do I Do It? by B. Wintner

    Tarot Beyond the Basics by A. Louis

    Jung & Tarot by S. Nichols

    Tarot & Astrology by C. Kenner

 

And there you have it!

I should probably note I left out recommendations that tallied up to less than three.

 

How many of these books have you read? How many do you own? What would you personally recommend? Are there any that you WOULDN'T recommend?

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xTheHermitx

I love lists like this, but also hate them...so much to read, so little time...

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Raggydoll
5 hours ago, katrinka said:

Some of those are actually quite good. Others, well... https://moz.com/beginners-guide-to-seo

I was thinking the same. I’ve read many of the classics on that list but some of the more contemporary ones I’m not as sure about. Or maybe I should say that they might not be for me 😊

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katrinka

There's some clinkers on the list, by any standard.

A marketing team can put over anything. Ack.

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alyce

Surprised to see Tarot Tells the Tale by James Ricklef left off the list. I bought it after repeated recommendations from the old folks at AT. It's quite alright.

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gregory

Yes - I love that (not to mention Knighthawk's Readings, its predecessor !) I used to plug it on AT - I wonder why I didn't plug it here... Maybe when we talked books before it was all abut how to learn the "meanings" and so on.

 

But there are indeed a couple of shockers on that list - as well as some Good Stuff.

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devin

If can could chime in and say that while I'm not a RWS aficionado, I am nothing but impressed with Waite's Pictorial Key to the Tarot. As far as divinatory meanings go, I'm not sure why anyone would need anything else. And it's available online for free: https://sacred-texts.com/tarot/pkt/index.htm

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Eric

The online free version of Waites book is not a perfect copy and are missing some important key sentences like for the High Priestess for example.

I need to get a copy of Eden Grays book.

Edited by Eric

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Rose Lalonde
12 hours ago, alyce said:

Surprised to see Tarot Tells the Tale by James Ricklef left off the list. I bought it after repeated recommendations from the old folks at AT. It's quite alright.

Seconded. 

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Phytomorphic

I really loved the creative tarot by jessa crispin

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EvelynnMorragan
On 1/16/2020 at 6:21 PM, katrinka said:

Some of those are actually quite good. Others, well... https://moz.com/beginners-guide-to-seo

I actually just learned how to better your searches through a Computer Fundamentals class I'm taking this winter break for an easy A. Lol.

 

But I'm interested in what books you specifically don't care for if you'd be willing to share.

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EvelynnMorragan
On 1/17/2020 at 2:05 AM, alyce said:

Surprised to see Tarot Tells the Tale by James Ricklef left off the list. I bought it after repeated recommendations from the old folks at AT. It's quite alright.

Is this out of print now?

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Rose Lalonde

Deleted. Hadn't had my morning tea and missed that the Ricklef link was already well covered.

☕☕☕

Edited by Rose Lalonde

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katrinka
3 hours ago, EvelynnMorragan said:

I actually just learned how to better your searches through a Computer Fundamentals class I'm taking this winter break for an easy A. Lol.

Yes. And I'm sure that marketers are well aware of how to optimize links so they feature more prominently in searches. So I'm not sure "most recommended" is applicable here.
I do see some on the list that get recommended a lot. The PKT is required reading, even though it has some issues. Others are more of a "flash in the pan."

 

3 hours ago, EvelynnMorragan said:

But I'm interested in what books you specifically don't care for if you'd be willing to share.

It's not really a matter of what I don't care for. If it was just personal taste, you could scratch a lot of the books with a modern psychological approach. But a lot of people just love that stuff, and they recommend the books. And some of those writers are very good at what they do. It's just not my thing.

 

So what I'm going by is practical value: Books that a good number of people seem to refer to again and again, and recommend to others. And what I'm seeing on this list doesn't necessarily reflect that. It only shows books in english, for instance. So some of the important writers - Tchalai Unger immediately comes to mind - have been left out, because of the way google works.

Papus? Yes, everyone should be familiar with that book since it's historically important, but it's not one that I see anyone suggesting to others. https://www.sacred-texts.com/tarot/tob/index.htm

 

Kitchen Table Tarot - It's not a bad book. It's just that beginner basics have been written a bazillion times before. You can get the information in the first few chapters of a more comprehensive book, or on virtually any internet forum. The gimmick with this book is that the author is engaging, like a somewhat entertaining neighbor you're friendly with. The Silver Ravenwolf style of writing. She seems like a nice lady, but that book is totally dispensable.

But I get the feeling you want me to dish a little dirt, so here it is, lol:

Tarosophy - It has good reviews on Amazon. That's because Katz is famous for recruiting people at his facebook groups to go write glowing five star reviews. Any one of his books will have some solid information - well, a little, about enough for a blog post - and a LOT of filler and nonsense. I haven't reviewed Tarosophy but I did review his Lenormand book some time ago, and all his writing suffers from similar issues: https://fennario.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/books-learning-lenormand/
And I really wanted to like that book, since there was hardly anything in english at the time. His Colman Smith book was the same way - a handful of interesting factoids and tons of padding. All of his stuff seems to be like that. He's not exactly highly recommended.




 

 



 

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_R_

Three books that deserve a mention are:


The Tarot: History, Mystery and Lore” by Cynthia Giles (one of the only books to seriously consider the science that has often been cited in connection with the Tarot - but which has seldom been dealt with.)

The Tarot: The Origins, Meaning and Uses of the Cards” by Alfred Douglas,

and Gerald Suster’s “The Truth About the Tarot: A Manual of Practice and Theory.

 

All three are well-written, informative and engaging.

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