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John Bauer Tarot


EmpyreanKnight

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EmpyreanKnight

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John Bauer (1882-1918) was one of the most appreciated Swedish artists and illustrators of the early XX century. His artwork, contemporary to those of Pamela “Pixie” Smith, brought to life a world of sweet and dark myth and folklore, where fairytales blend with pre-raphaelite imfluences. John Bauer died at the age of 36 in the Lake Vättern, in his beloved Sweden.

 

78 full colored cards & instructions

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Page of Ghosts

Oh, I was just thinking about his art and wanting to buy an art book with his illustrations! I might check out this tarot deck as well. I swear I must have read a fairy tale book illustrated by him as a child because some of his troll paintings look too familiar to me. It made me sad to read that he died so young, always doubted himself and didn't consider most of his children's illustrations "real art", it was something he did to pay the bills and he really wanted to work on other projects like fancy oil paintings, but I doubt he got to do as much of that as he wanted since his life was so short :'(

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I had several older Bauer prints in my bedroom as a young girl, and their landscapes were an important part of my childhood. I also had a passion for the "Among gnomes and trolls" books that he originally illustrated. He contributed greatly to the way Swedish folktales were depicted in people's minds. So this is a nice way to remind people of his art. I just wonder how they will try to describe his art pieces in a more tarot-friendly way. I am thinking that it might feel like a forced fit, but we shall see :)

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I had several older Bauer prints in my bedroom as a young girl, and their landscapes were an important part of my childhood. I also had a passion for the "Among gnomes and trolls" books that he originally illustrated. He contributed greatly to the way Swedish folktales were depicted in people's minds. So this is a nice way to remind people of his art. I just wonder how they will try to describe his art pieces in a more tarot-friendly way. I am thinking that it might feel like a forced fit, but we shall see :)

 

That's always a worry when I read about pre-made art made into tarot decks. On one hand the ideas/images of tarot are universal in many ways so there could be art that resonnates as certain cards even if they weren't specifically made for that purpose. On the other hand it can sometimes fall flat for me. We'll see when it comes :D His influence on Swedish folktales sounds a bit like Theodor Kittelsen and his trolls in Norway - I can't really imagine any kind of troll without thinking of his art of them.

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Page of ghosts: I had never heard of Theodore before, thanks for sharing! How about Ebbe Schön and his books, were they common in Norway? I remember loving all his books on folk tales and old traditions. He was very much like my grandfather in a way. My grandfather seriously believed in småfolk (there really is no good translation for that one, I think). I'm guessing you heard similar stories growing up :)

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Page of ghosts: I had never heard of Theodore before, thanks for sharing! How about Ebbe Schön and his books, were they common in Norway? I remember loving all his books on folk tales and old traditions. He was very much like my grandfather in a way. My grandfather seriously believed in småfolk (there really is no good translation for that one, I think). I'm guessing you heard similar stories growing up :)

 

When I google his books they look kind of familiar, but I can't really place them. They do look very cool! Might just add some of them to my wishlist ;) And the guy himself looks like a nisse/tomte! I have heard similar tales about the småfolk and I don't know about a good translation either. I have seen spirits used but I've always imagined them to have corporeal forms and strange supernatural powers.

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Page of ghosts: I had never heard of Theodore before, thanks for sharing! How about Ebbe Schön and his books, were they common in Norway? I remember loving all his books on folk tales and old traditions. He was very much like my grandfather in a way. My grandfather seriously believed in småfolk (there really is no good translation for that one, I think). I'm guessing you heard similar stories growing up :)

 

When I google his books they look kind of familiar, but I can't really place them. They do look very cool! Might just add some of them to my wishlist ;) And the guy himself looks like a nisse/tomte! I have heard similar tales about the småfolk and I don't know about a good translation either. I have seen spirits used but I've always imagined them to have corporeal forms and strange supernatural powers.

 

Yes he does look like a tomte (gnome)! I always liked that about him when I watched interviews or documentaries with him as a child. It made me even more sure that there really was such a thing as real gnomes. My grandfather used to tell me that if I wanted to have a chance of meeting a real gnome, then I had to sit in the forest for a long time, just watching and not making a sound. With time, they would have the courage to show themselves.

 

But he also told me the dangers about meeting a "Skogsrå" in the forest, so I wasn't very keen on sitting there all by myself. ("Skogsrå" is a type of creature from Swedish folk tales. It looks like a beautiful woman that will try to lure people deep into the woods and make them get lost. It is said that the only way you can reveal her true identity is that if you can get her to turn her back on you (her back is supposedly hollow). So that was the type of kid-friendly stories I grew up with ;D

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Page of ghosts: I had never heard of Theodore before, thanks for sharing! How about Ebbe Schön and his books, were they common in Norway? I remember loving all his books on folk tales and old traditions. He was very much like my grandfather in a way. My grandfather seriously believed in småfolk (there really is no good translation for that one, I think). I'm guessing you heard similar stories growing up :)

 

When I google his books they look kind of familiar, but I can't really place them. They do look very cool! Might just add some of them to my wishlist ;) And the guy himself looks like a nisse/tomte! I have heard similar tales about the småfolk and I don't know about a good translation either. I have seen spirits used but I've always imagined them to have corporeal forms and strange supernatural powers.

 

Yes he does look like a tomte (gnome)! I always liked that about him when I watched interviews or documentaries with him as a child. It made me even more sure that there really was such a thing as real gnomes. My grandfather used to tell me that if I wanted to have a chance of meeting a real gnome, then I had to sit in the forest for a long time, just watching and not making a sound. With time, they would have the courage to show themselves.

 

But he also told me the dangers about meeting a "Skogsrå" in the forest, so I wasn't very keen on sitting there all by myself. ("Skogsrå" is a type of creature from Swedish folk tales. It looks like a beautiful woman that will try to lure people deep into the woods and make them get lost. It is said that the only way you can reveal her true identity is that if you can get her to turn her back on you (her back is supposedly hollow). So that was the type of kid-friendly stories I grew up with ;D

 

I wonder if the Skogsrå is related to Huldra in some way? She is a beautiful woman who will lure men into the forest and she has a cow tail! Some sources claim a hollow back, sometimes together with the cow tail I think :(

 

My #1 folklore being fear might have been Draugen, the terrible spirit of a man drowned at sea who sails around in just one half of a boat. Spooky guy who WILL drag you into the waters with him!

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Page of ghost: Yes, huldra is the same thing. And there is also the sea version of her - Havsrå (very much like "Sirens") that make boats crash into rocks and so on. Whenever someone drowned (especially if it was a grown man) there was talk about these creatures having something to do with it. In reality it was probably alcohol that made most of these men drown, but then again.. who knows  ;)

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EmpyreanKnight

Through all of the Lo Scarabeo decks I posted, there's one thing that I noticed. They do listen to their market base, as they have finally dispensed with their ungainly multi-lingual borders. At last.

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Through all of the Lo Scarabeo decks I posted, there's one thing that I noticed. They do listen to their market base, as they have finally dispensed with their ungainly multi-lingual borders. At last.

 

Yeah, you are right. This is promising. There really needs to be tougher competition in the mass produced deck market so that things keep evolving. But as far as the Us games copyright logo on every card - let's just say I have given up on that 8)

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Dang. They beat me to it! :D I had one in the works for the longest time but it was really hard to find enough images to collage for a full deck. :-/ (I see we used the same image for Six of Wands haha)

 

The LoS looks really nice, tho. I'm really intrigued as to which images they used for the cards. (I'll def be getting this deck!)

 

I really love Bauer's art, especially his trolls and works on Scandinavian folklore and mythology. It inspired me at one point to do my take on our own local mythological creatures here at some point in the past.

 

-Ly

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EmpyreanKnight

Through all of the Lo Scarabeo decks I posted, there's one thing that I noticed. They do listen to their market base, as they have finally dispensed with their ungainly multi-lingual borders. At last.

 

Yeah, you are right. This is promising. There really needs to be tougher competition in the mass produced deck market so that things keep evolving. But as far as the Us games copyright logo on every card - let's just say I have given up on that 8)

 

Yeah, the main Tarot houses are upping their game. Aside from getting rid of their multilingual borders, Lo Scarabeo has begun offering decks in premium boxes like the Tarocchi Sola Busca, Tarocchino Mitelli, and the standard Santa Muerte, plus their LWBs are not generic now. I certainly didn't mind paying more for those. Llewellyn has replaced their floppy cardboard boxes with strong and sturdy kits with magnetic flaps like they did with the Linestrider, Modern Spellcaster's, and Celtic. Now if they can do something about their heartbreakingly thin cardstock. . .

 

Maybe it's because the market has begun expressing a marked preference for indie decks with excellent production values. Regarding US Games - well they did release a deck with no copyright logo in front last year. That is the Borderless Smith-Waite tho, and they did put their mark on the backs' borders, so it's like the exception that proved the rule sorta thing.

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Through all of the Lo Scarabeo decks I posted, there's one thing that I noticed. They do listen to their market base, as they have finally dispensed with their ungainly multi-lingual borders. At last.

They did do that quite a while ago... Just saying !

Dang. They beat me to it! :D I had one in the works for the longest time but it was really hard to find enough images to collage for a full deck. :-/ (I see we used the same image for Six of Wands haha)

 

The LoS looks really nice, tho. I'm really intrigued as to which images they used for the cards. (I'll def be getting this deck!)

So you did - now that I recall - you showed me a few cards. Oh well - at least we SHALL have one !

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