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chongjasmine

What is your religion?

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Though my parents didn't really enforce religious values in us, I was raised Roman Catholic. I'm not a particulalry devout person, I still identify as a Catholic. Religous enough to get a cross tattoo... but y'know, we're not supposed to get tattoos.  ;D I am Mexican though, so my particular brand of Catholicism is odd. Lots of old world beliefs mixed in with indigenous tradition.

 

Apart from that, spiritually, I honor and respect nature. I leave offerings and such for natural spirits, and quietly observe the sabbats.

 

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You can’t get past Step 3 in Alcoholics Anonymous without a higher power, so I have a higher power. It’s more of a sense of the order of the universe than a specific deity.

The NA workbook for the 12 Steps points out that I need to believe that there is something greater than myself, not that I have to believe in something greater. It is a subtle difference, but for me (like you), that power is of Nature and the Universe rather than a deity. Heck, gravity is more powerful than I am. ;D

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Though my parents didn't really enforce religious values in us, I was raised Roman Catholic. I'm not a particulalry devout person, I still identify as a Catholic. Religous enough to get a cross tattoo... but y'know, we're not supposed to get tattoos.  ;D I am Mexican though, so my particular brand of Catholicism is odd. Lots of old world beliefs mixed in with indigenous tradition.

 

Apart from that, spiritually, I honor and respect nature. I leave offerings and such for natural spirits, and quietly observe the sabbats.

 

When I take that quiz that was mentioned earlier, Roman Catholic comes out near the bottom of the list. But I love Mexican Catholicism - folk Saints like Pancho Villa (he has a candle, I'm told to offer him "a little wine and a little water"), Santa Muerte, and Jesus Malverde. It's like the Buddhist idea of Avalokisteshvara having compassion unconditionally for every sentient being - not just the churchy ones. Mexican folk Catholicism understands that people do what they need to do to live and raise their kids, and that's important. I'll drop a religion like a hot potato if it doesn't recognise that. And there's an idea that the Virgen de Guadalupe is Tonantzin. It's a beautiful thing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonantzin

 

And hey, Ephemeridae - sending you a PM.  8)

 

BTW - I remember this poem from third grade. I've been trying to "touch the whole elephant" ever since. I haven't succeeded - none of us can, IMHO - but it's been fun trying. http://www.constitution.org/col/blind_men.htm

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So interesting to see the diversity of religions here! I wasn't expecting nearly so much rep from organised religions. Gotta work on my biases, me.

 

For myself, I answer 'pagan' when I get asked this question, for the same reason I just say 'queer' when asked about my sexuality; it gives you the basic idea without going into all the details and labels. I started out Wiccan, but left that behind about a decade ago; now I'm making it up/figuring it out as I go. I do believe in a higher power, but one that's very alien and not sentient in the same way that humans are; and I believe in magic, although I don't know how or why it works. Everything else changes from week to week.

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So interesting to see the diversity of religions here! I wasn't expecting nearly so much rep from organised religions. Gotta work on my biases, me.

 

For myself, I answer 'pagan' when I get asked this question, for the same reason I just say 'queer' when asked about my sexuality; it gives you the basic idea without going into all the details and labels. I started out Wiccan, but left that behind about a decade ago; now I'm making it up/figuring it out as I go. I do believe in a higher power, but one that's very alien and not sentient in the same way that humans are; and I believe in magic, although I don't know how or why it works. Everything else changes from week to week.

 

I like this.  :D

 

Just because I don't believe in Skydaddy doesn't mean I'm a total atheist. There seems to be something behind it all, bigger and weirder than we can wrap our meat minds around.

 

Magic, I think, is just making things happen. Sometimes we understand the mechanics, and sometimes we don't.

 

"Magick is in effect anything that is changed by an act of will - no matter how profane. If I turn my dirty dishes into clean dishes it is magick - notwithstanding the help of a magickal lotion applied to the element of water and a few meaningful movements of my hands.

Crowley himself defined a Magickal operation 'as any event in nature which is brought to pass by Will' and added: 'We must not exclude potato-growing or banking from our definition. Let us take a very simple example of a Magical Act: that of a man blowing his nose.' (Magick in Theory and Practice)

 

I declare hereby that I have never denied the existance of potato-growing or banking, and I would not even rule out the possibility of men being able to blow their noses.

 

What I do deny is the existance of anything 'paranormal' and 'supernatural'. It just boggles my mind how people dream up anything 'supernatural' id est something that 'cannot be explained by the laws of the natural world' when they do not even know more than maybe 50% of those laws. Given the current state of physics, the inabilty to conclusively combine general relativity and quantum mechanics and the everlasting quest for the Holy Grail in form of the much mystified Grand Unification Theory we cannot even be sure about the 50%."

 

http://www.corax.com/tarot/index.html?creeds

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What I do deny is the existance of anything 'paranormal' and 'supernatural'. It just boggles my mind how people dream up anything 'supernatural' id est something that 'cannot be explained by the laws of the natural world' when they do not even know more than maybe 50% of those laws. Given the current state of physics, the inabilty to conclusively combine general relativity and quantum mechanics and the everlasting quest for the Holy Grail in form of the much mystified Grand Unification Theory we cannot even be sure about the 50%."

 

http://www.corax.com/tarot/index.html?creeds

 

^^This

 

It is perplexing to me how anyone can observe the world around them in its infinite complexity and think to themselves, "There must be something more."

 

I just don't understand. A person could quite literally spend their entire life dedicated to the study of the dirt in their back yard and not even scratch the surface, and they want more?

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The more comes from experiencing the more.

I am more sceptical than I lead people to believe, but when I experience things, I have to believe things.

 

To me, there is definitely more.

 

We are all constructs of our experiences.  8)

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The more comes from experiencing the more.

I am more sceptical than I lead people to believe, but when I experience things, I have to believe things.

 

To me, there is definitely more.

 

We are all constructs of our experiences.  8)

 

I go with this. I've experienced things which are not "scientifically" explainable. I have a background in scientific thought. But, when I experience something which is not explainable by that science ... I have had to accept the possibility that science doesn't cover all of human experience. The current label for such things is "supernatural". Meh, it's a label that most people understand, so I use it.

 

I do take a bit of an issue with the term "Judeo/Christian", though. Jews don't proselyze, or care what anybody else is praying to. The Old Testament is a very, very flawed translation of the Tanakh, and Jews know this. They also know that it is not literal, or a history book. Jews put it in context.

 

I know that term has been thrown around so much that it's a go-to. But it's wrong. If anybody doesn't want you doing your thing, it's the evangelicals and their predecessors. Not the Jews.

 

Dictionary.com defines "Judeo-Christian";

 

adjective

 

1. of or relating to the religious writings, beliefs, values, or traditions held in common by Judaism and Christianity.

 

Thus, the term does not connect Judaism with Christianity, except in the fact that Christianity has it's roots in Judaism. It is a fact that all of our Christian religions stem from Judaism, and it is a fact which is often neglectfully, or deliberately, forgotten. I can recall a discussion many years ago with a rather anti-Semitic individual who took offense to the idea that Jesus was a Jew. Fortunately, I rarely have to deal with such people these days.

 

Anyway, that was why I was using that particular term. It is, in my opinion, important to understand the roots of these religious beliefs. Without the understanding of the similarities, we end up hating each other for the mere fact that we label ourselves differently. But then, I guess a big part of humanity does that regardless.

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I do take a bit of an issue with the term "Judeo/Christian", though. Jews don't proselyze, or care what anybody else is praying to. The Old Testament is a very, very flawed translation of the Tanakh, and Jews know this. They also know that it is not literal, or a history book. Jews put it in context.

 

I know that term has been thrown around so much that it's a go-to. But it's wrong. If anybody doesn't want you doing your thing, it's the evangelicals and their predecessors. Not the Jews.

 

Dictionary.com defines "Judeo-Christian";

 

adjective

 

1. of or relating to the religious writings, beliefs, values, or traditions held in common by Judaism and Christianity.

 

It's an accepted term. It's just that they hold very little in common. http://www.religionfacts.com/charts/christianity-judaism

 

Thus, the term does not connect Judaism with Christianity, except in the fact that Christianity has it's roots in Judaism. It is a fact that all of our Christian religions stem from Judaism, and it is a fact which is often neglectfully, or deliberately, forgotten. I can recall a discussion many years ago with a rather anti-Semitic individual who took offense to the idea that Jesus was a Jew. Fortunately, I rarely have to deal with such people these days.

 

I've been meaning to compile a list of things that make people like that blow a gasket: Telling them Egypt is in Africa (and then showing them), Reagan started the Lifeline Program (and then showing them)...I'll add "Jesus was a Jew" to the list.  ;D

 

Anyway, that was why I was using that particular term. It is, in my opinion, important to understand the roots of these religious beliefs. Without the understanding of the similarities, we end up hating each other for the mere fact that we label ourselves differently. But then, I guess a big part of humanity does that regardless.

 

As mentioned, though, there really aren't that many similarities, and there shouldn't have to be. People shouldn't care if someone else has an altar dedicated to Spongebob. Religion is a personal choice, like who to have sex with. It's not other peoples' business.

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Buddhist (Mahayana). I use the cards to remind me of the Dharma and to create awareness around new perspectives to look at ongoing situations. So many of the cards in the traditional Tarot decks align with Buddha's story and with the different Buddhist teachings- I think the themes are just universal for all people interested in living a whole and aware life- no matter what spiritual path that person might be on. PLUS, the cards are beautiful- they are like little art museums in a box. So interesting on so many different levels, and I love hearing how different decks resonate with different people for different reasons. Bonding with someone over a spiritual desire to be a better person and make the world a more joyful and magical place is such a powerful thing.

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As mentioned, though, there really aren't that many similarities, and there shouldn't have to be. People shouldn't care if someone else has an altar dedicated to Spongebob. Religion is a personal choice, like who to have sex with. It's not other peoples' business.

 

Exactly. But try to convince the next Jehova's Witness or 7th Day Adventist or any other evangelistic zealot who knocks on your door of this.

 

But still, religion and history don't always go hand-in-hand. Religion only requires faith, not the facts one needs for understanding history.

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I'm a New Age, Christian, Polytheistic, Pagan, etc., etc., etc. ...

 

I took a quiz on "what religion am I?" It showed me matching up 0% to all religions. Which means, either I am all of them, or none of them.

 

http://www.beliefnet.com/entertainment/quizzes/beliefomatic.aspx?p=3

Oh that test was interesting!  Trogon, can you please change the p=3 to p=1 on your original link?  The way you have it now goes to page 3 of the quiz. ;) 

My results were 100% neo-pagan.  I am actually an Omnist.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnism

I also pray to Shiva, Ganesh, Bast, God and Jesus.

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http://selectsmart.com/RELIGION/ ...I tried this one out. It came up as 100% Unitarian Universalist and 96% Neo-Pagan. To be sure, I'm unsure. I used to 'be' something and belong but now I'm uncertain and because of this I am open but a ribbon in the wind at the same time. Taoist was in there somewhere, I like that too...whatever that means.

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I'm a New Age, Christian, Polytheistic, Pagan, etc., etc., etc. ...

 

I took a quiz on "what religion am I?" It showed me matching up 0% to all religions. Which means, either I am all of them, or none of them.

 

http://www.beliefnet.com/entertainment/quizzes/beliefomatic.aspx?p=1

Oh that test was interesting!  Trogon, can you please change the p=3 to p=1 on your original link?  The way you have it now goes to page 3 of the quiz. ;) 

My results were 100% neo-pagan.  I am actually an Omnist.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnism

I also pray to Shiva, Ganesh, Bast, God and Jesus.

 

Thanks for the heads up on this SaturnCeleste! It has now been fixed.

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http://selectsmart.com/RELIGION/ ...I tried this one out. It came up as 100% Unitarian Universalist and 96% Neo-Pagan. To be sure, I'm unsure. I used to 'be' something and belong but now I'm uncertain and because of this I am open but a ribbon in the wind at the same time. Taoist was in there somewhere, I like that too...whatever that means.

 

I liked this quiz. My top 5 according to this one is 100% Unitarian Universalist, 89% Neo-Pagan, 85% Liberal Quaker, 82% Taoism and 81% New Age. I like most of these (new age and neo-pagan are more like an umbrella term than something very specific here I think) so I think it was pretty accurate.

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OK, I just took the test and, as our American friends say, I am shook. I answered as truthfully as I can, and I scored 100% as an Orthodox Quaker from the Religious Society of Friends. Nothing wrong with being one, it's just that Roman Catholicism only came 2nd/3rd at 83%, same as Eastern Orthodoxy. I do have some beliefs that are not compatible with my faith, but still.

 

4th was Mainline Conservative Christian Protestant at 81%, and 5th was Seventh Day Adventist at 80%. All in my top 10 are Abrahamic religions, and I'm not surprised.

 

 

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So here are my results, and I was a little shocked. I didn't expect Orthodox Judaism, nor Mormonism. But at the same rate, I was pleasantly surprised, as my father has some Jewish roots. Bahai I can maybe see.

 

 

1.Orthodox Judaism (100%) 2.Reform Judaism (98%) 3.Islam (85%) 4.Sikhism (85%)5.Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (82%)6.Bahai (79%) 7.Mainline - Liberal Christian Protestants (74%) 8.Orthodox Quaker - Religious Society of Friends (73%) 9.Liberal Quakers - Religious Society of Friends (65%) 10.Neo-Pagan (65%)

 

 

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I think the themes are just universal for all people interested in living a whole and aware life- no matter what spiritual path that person might be on. PLUS, the cards are beautiful- they are like little art museums in a box. So interesting on so many different levels, and I love hearing how different decks resonate with different people for different reasons. Bonding with someone over a spiritual desire to be a better person and make the world a more joyful and magical place is such a powerful thing.

I absolutely agree with you.  You have written this beautifully!

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I was born Church of England (Protestant) Christian but my Parents weren't very strict about it and let me find my own spirituality. They were pretty lax and only attended at Christmas and Easter. I started to get quite religious when I was about 10 years old and would go to the church every Sunday (but the rest of the family had a lie in and stayed at home :) ). I was very involved with the church and organising and helping in the services. I decided I really wanted to go to a religious Church of England high school and I did. I have to say I never heard bigotry or anything anti LGBT or moralising from both my Church and school. They were open minded and progressive. I was working out that I was gay and I felt that they weren't against it but also you didn't talk about it.

 

I was quite religious in my late teens and took it very seriously but when I got into my 20's, I found it didn't fit my spiritual journey. I can't exactly say why but the community in my church was probably the most cliquey community I have ever been part of in my life and they didn't look out for people who were troubled or support everyone, it was gossipy and people trying to get in well with the main Vicar. They didn't follow the values or teachings of the services, I didn't feel I wanted to be part of it and I decided I was no longer Christian and became atheist and then a humanist (they believe in the value of a human and rationality about all else) but I believed there is a spiritual force out there. I believe there is something outside of the rational and scepticism and so in my 30's I am now Pagan / Wiccan and studying that.

 

My spiritual journey has changed about every 10 years! I am lucky that I had the freedom to find my own way and path and what works for me and I always think whatever works for everyone else. I can't say where I will go next :)

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My spiritual journey has changed about every 10 years! I am lucky that I had the freedom to find my own way and path and what works for me and I always think whatever works for everyone else. I can't say where I will go next :)

Mine has changed through the years also.  I think one of the most important things about getting older then older and finally really old is you do gain wisdom and insights.  I just wasn't the person back when I going to Unitarian, Greek Orthodox, Lutheran, Episcopalian, etc churches searching for a religion to call my own.

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I think the themes are just universal for all people interested in living a whole and aware life- no matter what spiritual path that person might be on. PLUS, the cards are beautiful- they are like little art museums in a box. So interesting on so many different levels, and I love hearing how different decks resonate with different people for different reasons. Bonding with someone over a spiritual desire to be a better person and make the world a more joyful and magical place is such a powerful thing.

I absolutely agree with you.  You have written this beautifully!

 

Thank you! and I agree with you on the "with age comes wisdom" theory- I'm *still* figuring out, so I just embrace what I believe but also leave room for all the mystery. Every day something in my perception shifts a little, and I feel like if I just chose all my bottom-line beliefs now it would be like choosing only one thing to eat the rest of my life and only having that. There's still too much out there I just don't know, I just have to remember to try and stay open.

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http://selectsmart.com/RELIGION/ ...I tried this one out. It came up as 100% Unitarian Universalist and 96% Neo-Pagan. To be sure, I'm unsure. I used to 'be' something and belong but now I'm uncertain and because of this I am open but a ribbon in the wind at the same time. Taoist was in there somewhere, I like that too...whatever that means.

 

Gave me Neo-Pagan & New Age as the top two. That seems to fit ...

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I come out as highest scoring in Universalist Unitarian in the quiz thingy. But in real life I adhere most to Zen Buddhist practice and was lay ordained a number of years ago. My practice has been up and down in recent years and I dropped going on retreats and sesshins when I was heavily pregnant with my son (now 4 and a half).

 

I've since thrown some esoteric things and other practices such as kundalini yoga into daily life that a Zen teacher would probably see as a bit of a  distraction from the path. But I'm comfortable with where I've ended up and now my son is growing up I've retaken 'the black' and am sitting again with the sangha and may even go on retreat in February.

 

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

 

 

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