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chongjasmine

What is your religion?

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Probably fairly rare for someone interested in tarot, but I'm an agnostic atheist  :)

 

I would describe myself the same way, only with a serious bit of Theravada (Thai Forest) Buddhism thrown in. 

 

If we adhere to pedantic definition of atheist, then it's impossible to be both atheist and agnostic.  But I'd rather keep things practical.  I live my life as an atheist, but I can neither prove nor disprove the existence/non-existence of any higher power(s).  So technically, I guess I'm an agnostic atheist wannabe :)

 

 

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I am a student, practitioner, (25 years) and teacher (15 years) of Tibetan Buddhism in the Gelugpa lineage. I did consider myself a buddhist since I was 17, though I had no specific lineage or teaching (other than books) until later in life.

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On 10/14/2017 at 1:38 AM, Trogon said:

 

 

However, in spite of all of this, I primarily believe that a person has got to find their own path to "salvation" and their own path to enlightenment. It is critical that a person understands the difference between these. Salvation is a religious belief that one must accept certain tenets of a particular dogma in order to gain one's entrance into "heaven". In Christianity, of course, that is the acceptance of Jesus as your personal savior. However, a great many Christian sects and/or cults, add a great pile of other rules and regulations which you also have to follow in order to gain your salvation. It is these rules and edicts, the dogma, which annoys me the most about main-stream religion. The whole "you must do what we tell you and do it the way we tell you" in order to get into "Heaven" thing is more about control and money, than it is about salvation.

 

Enlightenment is, on the other hand, finding your own truth and discovering that you can have a direct connection to that truth and the cosmos ... on your own. Yes, teachers can be helpful, even vital in discovering your truth. But those teachers do not necessarily need to be in corporeal human form. Many of us are already aware of certain Spirit Guides who are helping us, individually, on our paths towards that enlightenment.

 

This is not to say that the main-stream Judeo-Christian religions have no place, nor that they are bad. For many, many people, they are necessary and good and help them 

 

And for those of us who do better seeking our own paths, we have often started from a base in one main religion or other. But for us, it was not enough. Perhaps we found the dogma to be stale and meaningless, or maybe it was too restrictive. Instead, we wanted to find our own Truth. Most of us who do seek our paths discover that doing the "good works" are just the right thing to do and we really don't need the Church telling we should do them.

 

All of this is something that we, as Tarot readers, should probably keep in mind. Many of our clients come to us because they might be feeling spiritually lost to one extent or another. They may need some ideas about what first steps they need to take to start finding their own path towards enlightenment. I have had one reading, many years ago, where a person was suffering depression and other spiritual issues. I remember their "advice" card was the Hierophant - along with other indicators. I told them the cards were saying they needed the direction and structure of the Church ... They started feeling better as soon as they went back.

 

 

Have read all of this thread with great interest  l wanted to bring Trogan's comments to the fore again.  l have edited his text to select my own feelings and the ones in particular which resonated with me,  it is where l feel comfortable today.  Though Trogan's whole post is worth a second read. (page 1)

Like some people here l have walked the many paths of religious belief.  People are so diverse and likewise so are the many belief systems that exist.  That's the beauty.  We cannot all be packed into one sardine can, thank goodness we have the freedom to follow what sings to our heart.  

 

 

 

 

 

On 10/14/2017 at 1:38 AM, Trogon said:

 

 

 

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I’ve really enjoyed reading about how everyone found their current path.  

 

I’m a secular humanist.  Early on, my family of origin was Lutheran but then my parents joined one of the extreme Christian sects.  When I was a teenager, they moved us to a commune to join a cult which fortunately disbanded after one year.  It was the extremism that never set well with me, not the concepts of God or Christ.  I rather enjoyed the idea of God.  I just kept trying to make sense of everything and gradually settled upon my current path. 

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I just took the quiz mentioned by Trogon, at http://www.beliefnet.com/entertainment/quizzes/beliefomatic.aspx?p=1

 

According to that, I'm New Age . . . which I'm not!  I actually describe myself (playfully) as a Judaeo-Buddhist-Spiritualist-closet Christian!  In other words, I was brought up Jewish, converted to Buddhism, became a Spiritualist when I discovered I was a medium, and have a strong affinity to the teachings of Jesus.  In more serious mood, I describe myself as a Buddhist Spiritualist.  I am somewhat shocked to find that in its long list of religions, the quiz doesn't even mention Spiritualism.

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I took the test too. I consider myself a progressive and open minded christian with an interest and even belief in other forms of worship including sufism buddhism and witchcraft. 

 

 

I got liberal Quaker lol 

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