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Homemade tarot bags/purses/boxes


Raggydoll

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It's been a while since I made any new boxes, simply because most of my decks now have a suitable home. But ever since receiving the Earthbound oracle I have been wanting to make something nice for that deck. To be honest, the tuck box that it comes in is beyond flimsy and feels way too plasticky for an earth-centered deck (and an independently published one as well!). So I decided to go for a more 'natural' look. And I like it!

5.JPG.2a597cd9157ceb161862408ff018f3f6.JPG

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Oh my gosh! These are all so great! I usually sew my own simple drawstring bags, but I'm definitely going to try to make some boxes. That is such a cool idea : D

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I haven’t updated here in a while, but I recently made a little purse for my new Stretch tarot. I didn’t want to purchase any new fabric so I rummaged through my drawers and found this unused kitchen towel that felt like the perfect fit. I’m really happy with how it turned out  :heartz:

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l have read the whole thread and seen your beautiful bags and boxes.  They are all quite lovely you are so creative and inspirational.

Now l want to have a go at making the buttoned pouches, so fed up with drawstring bags.

l do have a couple of decks that need a nice new home. 

Question.... how do you make the loop for the button.

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l have read the whole thread and seen your beautiful bags and boxes.  They are all quite lovely you are so creative and inspirational.

Now l want to have a go at making the buttoned pouches, so fed up with drawstring bags.

l do have a couple of decks that need a nice new home. 

Question.... how do you make the loop for the button.

 

It’s actually quite simple. As I place both pieces of fabric together, I insert a piece of ribbon that I’ve shaped into a loop. I pin it to the middle of the short side. Then I see all the way around - leaving a gap that’s big enough so I can turn everything inside out. I go over the ribbon twice to make sure it sits securely.

 

I did some really quick sketches that hopefully explains this a bit better. Please excuse my sloppy handwriting, just wanted to highlight some especially important steps  ^-^

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I sometimes use elastic ribbons (like in this picture), but I have also used regular shiny non-elastic ribbons. I repurpose stuff all the time so I use anything that I can find. I like saving nice ribbons from birthday presents and I like to go to second hand stores to find vintage buttons.

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I posted this a while back in another thread but thought I would also post it here so it would be easier to find. :)

 

2 pieces of cotton fabric (one for the outside and one for the lining), 8 inches wide by 19 inches long

2 pieces of cording or ribbon, each 24 inches long

 

I used thin cardboard (like for folders) to draw off a pattern so I could trace it with all the openings marked. If I were going to do this by hand, I would change all the 5/8" measurements to 1/2" to make it simpler.

 

With the wrong sides of the two fabric pieces pinned together, mark the cord channel openings and the turn opening (see diagram 1) to see where to stop sewing and where to begin again. Remember to reinforce stitching where you stop and start. Seams allowances are 5/8". After sewing around the rectangle of fabric (stopping and starting at marked areas). Turn right side out and press with an iron. With a pencil, mark cord channels (see diagram 2) and sew channels on both ends of the rectangle, leaving openings on each side. Fold the rectangle in half (short end to short end) with lining side on the outside (see diagram 3); Sew the long sides together from the bottom of the cord channel, using a 1/4" seam. Turn right side out and thread the cord into the drawstring channel - the ends of one cord from the left side and the ends of the other cord from the right side. Tie the ends of each cord together in a knot.

 

This bag is rather roomy width-wise for normal-sized decks, so you can adjust the side measurements if you want a tighter fit.

EQdfXMo.jpg?1

p0YLVvv.jpg?1

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Raggydoll[/member], can you describe the type of cardboard and paper you like for the boxes?

 

I noticed above you mentioned 620g cardboard. I tried to look up how this is converted to typical US measurements (found a converter here: http://www.stillcreekpress.com/resources/) but the results are a bit confusing. I guess it would be about 230 lb in craft shop stock, which is pretty heavy.

 

For the paper weight you mentioned above, 130g, I guess this would be around 48 lb here in the US. That would be about double the weight of good quality ink jet paper for everyday use (24lb). Does that sound about right? (Cheap copy paper here is 20 lb.)

 

Also, the matte photo paper you mentioned, are you using that just for the decorations?

 

Thanks for your help. I think I'm going to give it a try. I have quite a few decks that could use a better home. And it looks like fun. And these make terrific gifts for other readers. Neat-o!

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<3 I was inspired by all the designs in this thread and decided to make my own tarot bag.

Luckily, I had all the materials available. I found about a yard of fabric with nice print that suits exactly my tastes. It reminds me of nature, and then it has these purple roses in the foreground. The green string is somewhat thin, but it’ll do. The most unnecessary part was the stopper thing lol. I just decided to throw it on there for funsies. Used a sewing machine to throw everything together.

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Raggydoll[/member], can you describe the type of cardboard and paper you like for the boxes?

 

I noticed above you mentioned 620g cardboard. I tried to look up how this is converted to typical US measurements (found a converter here: http://www.stillcreekpress.com/resources/) but the results are a bit confusing. I guess it would be about 230 lb in craft shop stock, which is pretty heavy.

 

For the paper weight you mentioned above, 130g, I guess this would be around 48 lb here in the US. That would be about double the weight of good quality ink jet paper for everyday use (24lb). Does that sound about right? (Cheap copy paper here is 20 lb.)

 

Also, the matte photo paper you mentioned, are you using that just for the decorations?

 

Thanks for your help. I think I'm going to give it a try. I have quite a few decks that could use a better home. And it looks like fun. And these make terrific gifts for other readers. Neat-o!

 

The cardboard is pretty thick (about 1 mm = 0,04 inches, according to google). The gram measurements is based on weight per cubic meter so I don’t know how to translate that. It’s probably easier to just go by thickness. I used the thickest one I could comfortably cut with my paper cutter.

 

As far as paper goes, regular printing paper is 80g here so 130g is a little less then double that. So what you’ve found should be perfect. I recommend that you go with acid free paper because it will touch your cards and it could age/deteriorate them over time if you use regular paper. Especially on the inside of the box.

 

And the matte printer paper is only used for decoration, so I could scan a card and not have to use the original picture. I found that matte paper gave a more ‘professional’ finish than glossy paper. I liked that it was waterproof because I like my boxes to be durable.

 

I hope this made sense!

 

Edit: I can try to take some pictures of the cardboard and the paper when I’m back home again, if that would help!

 

The cardboard is similar to this one. This is from the U.K. site but maybe it can be found on the us site too?! https://www.amazon.co.uk/Clairefontaine-Medium-Cardboard-Thick-Sheets/dp/B004A04ES0

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<3 I was inspired by all the designs in this thread and decided to make my own tarot bag.

Luckily, I had all the materials available. I found about a yard of fabric with nice print that suits exactly my tastes. It reminds me of nature, and then it has these purple roses in the foreground. The green string is somewhat thin, but it’ll do. The most unnecessary part was the stopper thing lol. I just decided to throw it on there for funsies. Used a sewing machine to throw everything together.

 

That’s great!! Thank you so much for sharing  <3 I was just gifted some fabric scraps from my mom and my sister so I feel inspired to make more bags now. I will share when I do  :heartz:

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I posted this a while back in another thread but thought I would also post it here so it would be easier to find. :)

 

2 pieces of cotton fabric (one for the outside and one for the lining), 8 inches wide by 19 inches long

2 pieces of cording or ribbon, each 24 inches long

 

I used thin cardboard (like for folders) to draw off a pattern so I could trace it with all the openings marked. If I were going to do this by hand, I would change all the 5/8" measurements to 1/2" to make it simpler.

 

With the wrong sides of the two fabric pieces pinned together, mark the cord channel openings and the turn opening (see diagram 1) to see where to stop sewing and where to begin again. Remember to reinforce stitching where you stop and start. Seams allowances are 5/8". After sewing around the rectangle of fabric (stopping and starting at marked areas). Turn right side out and press with an iron. With a pencil, mark cord channels (see diagram 2) and sew channels on both ends of the rectangle, leaving openings on each side. Fold the rectangle in half (short end to short end) with lining side on the outside (see diagram 3); Sew the long sides together from the bottom of the cord channel, using a 1/4" seam. Turn right side out and thread the cord into the drawstring channel - the ends of one cord from the left side and the ends of the other cord from the right side. Tie the ends of each cord together in a knot.

 

This bag is rather roomy width-wise for normal-sized decks, so you can adjust the side measurements if you want a tighter fit.

EQdfXMo.jpg?1

p0YLVvv.jpg?1

 

Thank you!!! I have to study this more closely to figure out how you do it. We use different methods (mine is constructed as simply as possible, in my mind). I loved the look of yours <3

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